Tea Review: 2003 Aged Green Heart Oolong

This tea is really what sparked my order from What-Cha. I saw a review of the 2003 Aged Green Heart Oolong and heard how it won second place at the Fall 2014 North American Tea Championship for the Aged/Baked Oolong category. They were beat out by The Tea Kings, another company that I really admire due to their tea education and selection, and their Traditional Coal Fired Tieguanyin Wulong. Now the Aged Green Heart is actually made by the Taiwanese Mountain Tea Co. and sold by What-Cha. I would put Mountain Tea's Dong Ding as one of my favorite teas of all time, so they know what they're doing when it comes to roasted oolong!

The first thing I noticed was how insanely small and tightly rolled the leaves were. For comparison, L to R: Dong Ding, Jade Oolong, and Aged Green Heart.

The first thing I noticed was how insanely small and tightly rolled the leaves were. For comparison, L to R: Dong Ding, Jade Oolong, and Aged Green Heart.

I used the recommended teaspoon or 5g of tea leaf. This photo is after a rinse to open up the leaves a little and warm up the gaiwan

I used the recommended teaspoon or 5g of tea leaf. This photo is after a rinse to open up the leaves a little and warm up the gaiwan

I went with the recommended 185F (Hey, I'm following the directions for once!)

I went with the recommended 185F (Hey, I'm following the directions for once!)

The color was a gentle yellow with a tinge of honey orange.

The color was a gentle yellow with a tinge of honey orange.

I believe this is after 5 infusions. It's incredible that these leaves and stems came from such tightly rolled oolong balls. The leaves show signs of aging, they are more kale-like and maintained a dark coloration. With other, younger roasted oolongs the leaves will still flatten out after several steepings.

I believe this is after 5 infusions. It's incredible that these leaves and stems came from such tightly rolled oolong balls. The leaves show signs of aging, they are more kale-like and maintained a dark coloration. With other, younger roasted oolongs the leaves will still flatten out after several steepings.

This tea really did live up to expectations. It was complex, very hardy, and got me tea-drunk-wasted. The flavor's noted by What-Cha were "walnut shell and ripe fruit." I didn't get any ripe fruit but was ever walnut, with or without shell, the dominate flavor. This tea had a subdued smell as opposed to Dong Ding, perhaps having to do with age. The mouthfeel was very solid and created the complexity of the tea.

Go ahead and chalk this one up to another satisfying experience from this What-Cha order.